Wednesday, 28 November 2007

Phoning overseas in North Korea earns you the death penalty

The concentration camp known as North Korea demonstrates its terrific respect for human rights, as codified in the United Nations' Charter.

The blathering multiculturalists who tell us that all cultures are equal and that we have to respect others' values are quiet when North Koreans execute people for making overseas phone calls but if foreigners ever come to Australia then the same group noisily protests that it's a woman's 'right' to wear the veil or dress up like an organic mailbox by donning a full burqa.
A North Korean factory chief was executed by a firing squad in front of a stadium of 150,000 people after being accused of making international phone calls, an aid group reports.

The man had been caught calling overseas on 13 phones he had installed and hidden away in a factory basement, the South Korean aid agency Good Friends said in a report on the North's human rights.

A massive crowd of 150,000 filled a stadium and watched the man die.

Despite an overall decline since 2000, public executions have recently been on the increase and officials accused of drug smuggling, embezzlement and other crimes are the main targets.

In the same incident, six people were crushed to death and 34 others were injured as people stampeded out of the stadium.
So what caused the stampede? Ironically, more people were killed exiting the event than were actually being executed in the first place.
Most North Koreans are banished from communicating with the outside world because of the country's regime that seeks to prevent any possibility of challenge to leader Kim Jong Il.

The North has carried out four other similar executions to various other factory chiefs in the past few months, the group reported.

"It is aimed at educating (North Koreans) to control society and prevent crimes," Good Friends head Venerable Pomnyun said.
No wonder the left doesn't make much noise. "...control society..." is what they're all about and they all have a totalitarian streak a mile wide.
The group has not said how it obtained the information and has given no details of how many executions have taken place.

The report comes just a week after a UN General Assembly Committee adopted a draft resolution expressing concern at reports of maltreatment and human rights violations in North Korea.
Hands up anyone who thinks that the UN is anything other than morally bankrupt when it treats regimes like North Korea not only with kid gloves but also to handouts of millions of aid dollars - in cash.
The country has blasted the report, however, saying it is inaccurate and biased.

They say they do not violate human rights but the regime has long been accused of imposing the death penalty for political reasons, torturing border-crossers and restricting freedom on expression and religion.
People eat bark off the trees to survive but they don't violate human rights. No worries.

(Nothing Follows)

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