Monday, 18 February 2008

The Fascist roots of Democratic Socialism aka modern liberalism

If you're on the left and still refer to the right as 'fascists' then a short history lesson is in order. You may be shocked at the genesis of your so-called compassionate ideas.

In Thomas Sowell's brief review of Jonah Goldberg's new book Liberal Fascism, he nails the major belief frameworks of both liberalism and conservatism.
Those who put a high value on words may recoil at the title of Jonah Goldberg’s new book, Liberal Fascism. As a result, they may refuse to read it, which will be their loss — and a major loss.

Those who value substance over words, however, will find in this book a wealth of challenging insights, backed up by thorough research and brilliant analysis.

This is the sort of book that challenges the fundamental assumptions of its time — and which, for that reason, is likely to be shunned rather than criticized.

Because the word “fascist” is often thrown around loosely these days, as a general term of abuse, it is good that Liberal Fascism begins by discussing the real Fascism, introduced into Italy after the First World War by Benito Mussolini.

The Fascists were completely against individualism in general and especially against individualism in a free-market economy. Their agenda included minimum-wage laws, government restrictions on profit-making, progressive taxation of capital, and “rigidly secular” schools.

Unlike the Communists, the Fascists did not seek government ownership of the means of production. They just wanted the government to call the shots as to how businesses would be run.

They were for “industrial policy,” long before liberals coined that phrase in the United States.

Indeed, the whole Fascist economic agenda bears a remarkable resemblance to what liberals would later advocate.

Moreover, during the 1920s “progressives” in the United States and Britain recognized the kinship of their ideas with those of Mussolini, who was widely lionized by the Left.

Famed British novelist and prominent Fabian socialist H. G. Wells called for “Liberal Fascism,” saying “the world is sick of parliamentary politics.”

Another literary giant and Fabian socialist, George Bernard Shaw, also expressed his admiration for Mussolini — as well as for Hitler and Stalin, because they “did things,” instead of just talk.

In Germany, the Nazis followed in the wake of the Italian Fascists, adding racism in general and anti-Semitism in particular, neither of which was part of Fascism in Italy or in Franco’s Spain.

Even the Nazi variant of Fascism found favor on the Left when it was only a movement seeking power in the 1920s.

W. E. B. DuBois was so taken with the Nazi movement that he put swastikas on the cover of a magazine he edited, despite complaints from Jewish readers.

Even after Hitler achieved dictatorial power in Germany in 1933, DuBois declared that the Nazi dictatorship was “absolutely necessary in order to get the state in order.”

As late as 1937 he said in a speech in Harlem that “there is today, in some respects, more democracy in Germany than there has been in years past.”

In short, during the 1920s and the early 1930s, Fascism was not only looked on favorably by the Left but recognized as having kindred ideas, agendas, and assumptions.

Only after Hitler and Mussolini disgraced themselves, mainly by their brutal military aggressions in the 1930s, did the Left distance itself from these international pariahs.

Fascism, initially recognized as a kindred ideology of the Left, has since come down to us defined as being on “the Right” — indeed, as representing the farthest Right, supposedly further extensions of conservatism.

If by conservatism you mean belief in free markets, limited government, and traditional morality, including religious influences, then these are all things that the Fascists opposed just as much as the Left does today.

The Left may say that they are not racists or anti-Semites, like Hitler, but neither was Mussolini or Franco. Hitler, incidentally, got some of his racist ideology from the writings of American “progressives” in the eugenics movement.

Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism is too rich a book to be summarized in a newspaper column. Get a copy and start rethinking the received notions about who is on “the Left” and who is on “the Right.” It is a book for people who want to think, rather than repeat rhetoric.
Here's a question for you. Which government in history implemented democratic socialism, aimed to implement a ban on smoking, introduce compulsory vegetarianism and built a large natural medicine research centre?

Hitler's Nazis.

Of course.

When today's control-our-diet fanatics are referred to as Food Nazis it's actually an apt term.

(Nothing Follows)

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you. I must read this. Reggie von Zugbach

Elijah said...

The reason we have the Facists on "the Right" these days is thanks to the Frankfurt School.

Jack Lacton said...

Correct, Elijah.

What's his name? Gramaldi, from the Frankfurt School, was a brilliant strategist who promoted the tactic of criticising everything on the right in order to break down resolve and morale without having to have a counter argument. It's why today's left uses pejorative terms rather than argue their case.

Coach iPhone 6 Plus Cases said...

One of the exciting rumors going around these days is that the iPad Pro will have a split screen viewing mode to enable users to use several applications simultaneously.

chenlina said...

chenlina20160521
louboutin pas cher
coach outlet
fitflop sandals
louis vuitton outlet
lebron 13
jordan 3 white cenment
ralph lauren uk
michael kors handbags
polo ralph lauren
ray ban sunglasses
ray ban sunglasses discount
louis vuitton bags
gucci outlet
kate spade handbags
hollister uk
polo ralph lauren
michael kors handbags
replica watches
michael kors outlet
cheap jordans
fake watches
tiffany and co
juicy couture
ray bans
michael kors uk
coach outlet online
air jordan 13
coach factory outlet
kate spade handbags
ray ban sunglasses
louis vuitton handbags
jordan shoes
ralph lauren outlet
cheap jordan shoes
timberland boots
louis vuitton handbags
nike sb
oakley sunglasses
coach outlet
louis vuitton outlet
as

Zhenhong Bao said...

lululemon outlet
links of london
calvin klein underwear
michael kors outlet
cazal outlet
coach outlet online
timberland boots
michael kors outlet online
michael kors uk outlet
celine outlet
hollister clothing store
oakley sunglasses
swarovski crystal
oakley canada
kate spade uk
michael kors outlet
ferragamo shoes
ray ban sunglasses
air max 90
nike air max 90
lebron james shoes
toms outlet
louis vuitton handbags
cartier watches for sale
bottega veneta outlet online
louis vuitton outlet store
true religion outlet uk
ralph lauren uk
timberland shoes
nfl jerseys wholesale
polo ralph lauren
timberland shoes
hermes outlet
nike roshe run
beats by dr dre
20160531zhenhong

xjd7410@gmail.com said...

ray ban sunglasses outlet
coach outlet store online clearances
louis vuitton outlet
adidas shoes
polo ralph lauren outlet
kobe shoes
michael kors handbags
louboutin shoes
cheap louis vuitton handbags
asics outlet
nike outlet
mont blanc pens
louis vuitton handbags
pandora outlet
louis vuitton
louis vuitton outlet
toms wedges
christian louboutin sale
michael kors handbags
louis vuitton
ed hardy outlet
coach outlet store online
ray ban sunglasses
michael kors outlet
louis vuitton purses
oakley sunglasses
coach outlet store online
louis vuitton outlet stores
louis vuitton outlet
chenyingying20160801