Saturday, 21 June 2008

Indian woman mistakes rapist for husband

One of the great things about reading the papers from India, Pakistan and Turkey etc is the wonderful use and occasional mangling of the English language that takes place.

This article
from The Times of India reports on an Indian woman who let a man rape her because she thought he was her husband.
NAGPUR: In a bizarre incident, a 20-year-old woman in a village around 9 kilometres away from Kalameshwar near here, initially mistook her rapist for her husband, and let him have intercourse with her, while her husband slept only a few feet away from her. However, realising her mistake, she soon raised an alarm, and her husband chased the miscreant, but he escaped into the night.
Rape aside, it sounds like a scene from an Errol Flynn movie...husband only a few feet away...miscreant...escaping into the night... When was the last time you saw the word 'miscreant' used in a news article?
The couple later lodged a complaint with Kalameshwar police station, who then registered a case of rape against the miscreant, who remains untraced. Local police say that a search party has been sent to nab him.
"...nab him"...that's great! Can you imagine the Times of London using such language? "A 25 year old South Asian miscreant was nabbed today by Interpol as he tried to board a plane to Prague." Perhaps 'miscreant' can replace 'terrorist' in politically correct papers around the world. 'Islamic Miscreant' has a nice ring to it.
The incident took place at around 10 pm on Tuesday, when both Savita and her husband 23-year-old Harish (both names changed) were asleep in their house. Harish was sleeping on a cot, while Savita was on the floor only a few feet away.
As is the correct order of things. Sensible people, those Indians.
Sources say that the accused, identified as one Sanjay Khade (35), somehow broke open the locked door to the house, entered the room they were sleeping in, and lay down beside Savita. She apparently assumed that it was her husband, and let him continue his advances.

Soon after the imposter had finished his act the lady, felt that the person beside her was of a stockier build than her husband, and started shouting. Hearing her scream, Harish woke up and chased Khade, who was a resident of the same village. The accused fled into the night, and the couple lodged a complaint against him on Wednesday. Further investigation into the matter is under way, it is reported.
"Soon after the imposter had finished his act..." - where do these journalists learn their use of English? At the Oscar Wilde school of writing?

It could happen to anyone, I guess?

(Nothing Follows)

2 comments:

Poster said...

My theory is that Indians use English as it was used 60 years ago while they were still a colony.

Jack Lacton said...

Poster,

Not only that but they also use it more correctly than most of use in the English-speaking world.